×

[PR]この広告は3ヶ月以上更新がないため表示されています。
ホームページを更新後24時間以内に表示されなくなります。

   ツバメの巣Top > Study > English > Charlotte's Web 5
*
Charlotte's Web 5
X. Charlotte
(5.シャーロット)

The night seemed long. Wilbur's stomach was empty and his mind was full. And when your stomach is empty and your mind is full, it's always hard to sleep.
(夜がとても長く感じられました。ウィルバーのおなかの中は、からっぽでしたが、頭の中は思いでいっぱいでした。そして、おなかの中がからっぽで、頭の中がいっぱいというときは、なかなか眠れないものです。)

A dozen times during the night Wilbur woke and stared into the blackness, listening to the sounds and trying to figure out what time it was. A barn is never perfectly quiet. Even at midnight there is usually something sirring.
(ウィルバーは、夜中に何度も目を覚まし、闇を見つめながら、周りの音を聞いて、今は何時だろうか、と考えました。納屋は、しーんと静まりかえることはありません。真夜中でも、たいていは、何か動きがあるのです。)

The first time he woke, he heard Templeton gnawing a hole in the grain bin. Templeton's teeth scraped loudly against the wood and made quite a racket. "That crazy rat!" thought Wilbur. "Why dose he have to stay up all night, grinding his clashers and destroying people's property? Why can't he go to sleep, like any decent animal?"
(最初に目を覚ましたときは、テンプルトンが穀物の貯蔵箱に穴をあけているところでした。テンプルトンの歯が木をガリガリとかじる音が、大きく響いていました。「しょうがないねずみだな。なんだって夜中に起きてて、牙をといだり、人間のものを壊したりするんだろう? どうして、他のちゃんとした動物みたいに、夜に眠ることができないんだろう?」とウィルバーは、思いました。)

The second time Wilbur woke, he heard the goose turning on her nest and chuckling to herself.
(次にウィルバーが目を覚ましたときには、ガチョウのおばさんがグワッグワッといいながら、巣の上で向きを変えているところでした。)

"What time is it? whispered Wilbur to the goose."
(「今何時なの?」ウィルバーは、小さな声でガチョウに尋ねました。)

"Probably-obably-obably about half-past eleven," said the goose. "Why aren't you a sleep, Wilbur?"
(「たぶん、多分、多分、11時半くらいじゃないかね。あんた、どうして起きているの、ウィルバー?」と、ガチョウのおばさんが言いました。)

"Too many things on my mind," said Wilbur.
(「頭の中がいっぱい過ぎるんだよ。」とウィルバー。)

"Well," said the goose, "that's not my trouble. I have nothing at all on my mind, but I've too many things under my behind. Have you ever tried t osleep while sitting on eight eggs?"
(「あらまぁ、私は、そんなことないね。頭の中には、何もないからさ。でも、おしりの下には、いっぱいいっぱいあるんだけどね。あんた、たまご8個を温めながら眠ろうとしたことはあるかい?」)

"No," replied Wilbur. "I suppose it is uncom for table. How long does it take a goose egg to hatch?"
(「ううん。きっと、モゾモゾするんだろうな。ガチョウのたまごってどのくらいしたら孵るの?」)

"Approximately-oximately thirty days, all told," answered the goose. "But I cheat a little. On warm afternoons, I just pull a little atraw over the eggs and go out for a walk."
(「だいたい30日くらいかしら、かしら。」とガチョウは答えました。「でも、あたしは、ちょっとばかりズルをしているんだよ。お昼過ぎの暖かいときには、たまごの上にちょこっと藁をかけておいて、散歩に出かけるのさ。」)

Wilbur yawned and went back to sleep. In his dreams he heard again the voice saying, "I'll be a fiend to you. Go to sleep--you'll see me in the morning."
(ウィルバーは、あくびをして、また眠りました。夢の中でまたさっきの声がしました。「わたし、お友達になってあげるわ。おやすみなさい。朝になったら会いましょうね。」)

About half an hour before dawn, Wilbur woke and listened. The barn was still dark. The sheep lay motionless. Even the goose was quiet. Overhead, on the main floor, nothing stirred: the cows were resting, the hourses dozed. Templeton had quit work and gone off somewhere on an errand. The only sound was a slight scraping noise from the rooftop, where the weather-vane swung back and forth. Wilbur loved the barn when it was like this--calm and quiet, waiting for light.
(夜が明ける30分ほど前に、ウィルバーは、目を覚まし、耳をそばだてました。納屋の中は、まだ真っ暗でした。羊たちはおとなしく寝ていました。ガチョウのおばさんも静かです。上の階もひっそりとしていました。雌牛は眠り、馬はまどろんでいるのでしょう。テンプルトンは、作業をやめて、どこかへ用足しにでかけていました。聞こえるのは、屋根の上で、かすかにきしる音ばかり。風見がくるくると回っている音です。ウィルバーは、こんなときの納屋が大好きでした。納屋も静かに夜明けを待っているのです。)

"Day is almost here," he thought.
(「もうすぐ朝がくるぞ。」とウィルバーは、思いました。)

Through a small window, a faint gleam appeared. One bu one the stars went out. Wilbur could see the goose a few feet away. She sat with head tucked under a wing. Then he could see the sheep and the lambs. The sky lightened.
(小さな窓が、ほんのりと白み始めました。星がひとつ、またひとつと消えていきました。すぐそこにガチョウのおばさんが見えてきました。頭を翼に突っ込んでいます。そのうちに、羊や子羊の姿も見えてきました。空が明るくなってきたのです。)

"Oh, beautiful day, it is here at last! Today I shall find my friend."
(「ああ、きれいな朝だ。ようやく夜が明けた!!今日は、友達に会えるぞ。」)

Wilbur looked everywhere. He searched his pen thoroughly. He examined the window ledge, stared up at the ceiling. But he saw nothing new. Finally he decided he would have to spoke up. He hated to break the lovely stillness of dawn by using his voice, but he couldn't think of any other way to locate the mysterious new friend who was nowhere to be seen. So wilbur cleared his throat.
(ウィルバーは、あたりをきょろきょろ見回しました。部屋の中を隅々まで探してみました。窓敷居を調べ、天井を見上げました。でも、何も変わったのは、見つかりません。とうとうウィルバーは、声をかけてみることにしました。本当は、大声を出して、夜明けのすばらしい静けさをやぶりたくなかたのです。でも、どこを探しても不思議な友達は、見つからなかったので、呼んでみる以外に方法はないように思えました。そこで、ウィルバーは、咳払いをしてから、はっきりと大きな声で言いました。)

"Attention, please!" he said in a loud, firm voice. "Will the party who addressed me at bedtime last night kindly make himself or herself known by giving an appropriate sign or signal!"
(「どうか聞いてください!夕べ、寝るときに僕に声をかけてくれた方、どうか合図をしてどこにいるか、教えてくれませんか?」)

Wilbur paused and listened. All the other animals lifted their heads and stared at him. Wilbur blushed. But he saw determined to get in touch with his unknown friend.
(ウィルバーは、みみを澄ましました。他の動物たちが、頭を持ち上げて、じろじろ見ています。ウィルバーは、赤くなりました。でも、どうしても声をかけてくれた友達と連絡をとろうと、心に決めていました。)

"Attention, please!" he said. "I will repeat the message. Will the party who addressed me at bedtime last night kindly speak up. please tell me where you are, if you are my friend!"
(「聞いてください!僕、もう一度繰り返します。夕べ、寝るときに僕に声をかけてくれた方、どうか返事をしてください。友達ならどこにいるのか教えてください!!」)

The sheep looked at each other in disgust.
(羊たちがウンザリしたように顔を見合わせました。)

"Stop your nonsense, Wilbur!" said the oldest sheep. "If you have a new friend here, you are probably disturbing his rest; and the quickest way to spoil a friendship it to wake somebody up in the morning before he is ready. How can you be sure your friend is an early riser?"
(「うるさいわよウィルバー。」一番年上の羊が、言いました。「もし、その新しい友達とやらが、ここにいるとしても、あんたがその友達の眠りを邪魔しているじゃないの。友情を壊す早道は、まだ眠っている友達を、無理に起こすことだよ。その友達が、早起きかどうかあんだ、わかってんの??」)

"I beg everyone's pardon," whispered Wilbur. "I didn't mean to be objectionable."
(「ごめんなさい。いやな思いをさせるつもりはなかったんです。」とウィルバーは、小さな声で謝りました。)

He lay down meekly in the manure, facing the door. He did not know it, but his friend was very near. And the old sheep was right--the friend was still asleep.
(ウィルバーは、戸口のほうを向いて、堆肥の上におとなしく横になりました。まだ知らなかったのですが、友達は、すぐそばにいたのです。それに友達は、羊の言ったとおり まだ眠っていたのです。)

Soon Lurvy appeared with slops for breakfast. Wilbur rushed out, ate everything in a hurry, and licked the trough. The sheep moved offdown the lane, the gander waddled along behind them, pulling grass. And then, just as Wilbur was setting down for his morning nap, he heard again the thin voice that had addressed him the night before.
(まもなく、ラーヴィーが、残飯を持ってきました。朝ごはんの時間でした。ウィルバーは、飛び出して行って、がつがつと、残飯を食べ、餌箱まできれいになめました。羊たちは、小道を通って草地に出て行き、ガチョウのおじさんも、羊の後から草をつっつきながらヨチヨチと外に出て行きました。ウィルバーが、朝のうたた寝をしようとしていたときです。夕べ聞いたか細い声が、また聞こえてきました。)

"Salutations!" said the voice.
(「ご機嫌うるわしくていらっしゃる?」とその声は、言いました。)

Wilbur jumped to his feet. "Salu-what?" he cried.
(ウィルバーは、はっとして起き上がりました。「ごきげん、なんですって?」)

"Salutations!" repeated the voice.
(「ごきげんうるわしくていらっしゃる?」とその声は、繰り返しました。)

"What are they, and where are you?" screamed Wilbur. "Please, please, tell me where you are. And what say 'salutations,' it's just my fancy way of saying hello or good morning. Actually, it's silly expression, and I am surprised that I used it at all. As for my where-abouts, that's easy. Look up here in the corner of the doorway! Here I am. Look, I'm waving!"
(「それ、どういう意味なの?それに、きみは、どこにいるの?」とウィルバーは叫びました。「お願い、どこにいるのか教えて。それに、何を言っているのかも教えてよ。」「私は、ただご挨拶しているだけだよ。」と言いました。「こんにちは、とか、おはようって言う代わりに、そう言ったの。でも変な言い方かも知れないね。どうして、こんな言い方したのか、自分でもわからないわ。私の居場所なら、簡単よ。戸口の上の隅っこを見て!!ほらねここよ。合図してるでしょ。」)

At last Wilbur saw the creature that had spoken to him in such a kindly way. Stretched across the upper part of the doorway was a big spiderweb, and hanging from the top of the web, head down, was a large grey spoder. She was about the size of a gumdrop. She had eight legs, and she was waving one of them at Wilbur in friendly greeting. "See me now?" shw asked.
(ようやくウィルバーは、親切に声をかけてくれた友達を見つけました。戸口の方に、大きなくもの巣がかかっていて、そのくもの巣のてっぺんから、大きな灰色のクモが、頭をさかさまにしてぶら下がっていました。ゼリーキャンディーくらいの大きさのクモです。8本ある足の1本を、ウィルバーに向かって振っていました。「見えたでしょ?」クモは言いました。)

"Oh, yes indeed," said Wilbur. "Yes indeed! How are you? Good morning! Salutations! Very pleased to meet you. What is your name, please? May I have your name?"
(「うん、見えたよ。」とウィルバーはこたえました。「ちゃんと見えた!はじめまして。おはよう!ごきげんうるわしくて? 会えて嬉しいな。名前はなんて言うの?名前教えてくれないかな?」)

"My name," said the spider, "is Charlotte."
(「私の名前は、シャーロット。」とクモは言いました。)

"Charlotte what?" asked Wilbur, eagerly.
(「名字は?」ウィルバーは、勢い込んで尋ねました。)

"Charlotte A.Cavatica. But just call me Charlotte."
(「シャーロット・A・キャバティカって言うの。でも、シャーロットって呼んでね。」)

"I think you're beautiful," said Wilbur.
(「きみは、きれいだね。」ウィルバーは、言った。)

"Well, i am pretty," replied Charlotte. "There's no denying that. Almost all spiders are rather nice-looking. I'm not as flashy as some, but I'll do. I wish I could see you, Wilbur, as clearly as you can see me."
(「ええ、私は、きれいなの。それは、間違いないわね。クモは、たいていみんな美しい姿をしているのよ。雲の中には、もっと派手なものもいるけど、私は、これでいいのウィルバー、わたしにも、あなたがはっきり見えるといいんだけど…。」)

"Why can't you? asked the pig. "I'm right here."
(「どうして見えないの?僕ここにいるでしょ。」)

"Yes, but I'm near-sighted. It's good in some ways, not so good in others. Watch me wrap up this fly."
(「ええ、でも私は、近眼なの。そのほうが便利な時もあるけど、そうでないときもある。このハエ、くるんじゃうから見ててね。」)

A fly that had been crawling along Wilbur's trough had flown up and blundered into the lower part of Charlotte's web and was tangled in the sticky threads. The fly was beautiful its wings furiously, trying to break loose and free itself.
(ウィルバーの餌箱のうえの這っていた1匹のハエが、飛び上がったようにシャーロットの網の下のほうに引っかかり、ネバネバした糸に絡まってしまった。ハエは、バタバタと羽を動かして、網から抜け出そうと、もがいていました。)

"First," said Charlotte, "I dive at him." She plunged headfirst toward the fly. As she dropped, a tiny silken thread unwound fro, her rear end.
(「まず最初に、私は、飛び掛るのよ。」そう言うと、シャーロットは、ハエに向かって突進しました。細い絹のような糸を後ろから紡ぎだしながら、スーッと下がってきます。)

"Next, I wrap him up." She grabbed the fly, threw a few jets of silk around it, and rolled it over and over, wrapping it so that it couldn't move. Wilbur watched in horror. He could hardly believe what he was seeing, and although he deteddted flies, he was sorry for this one.
(「そして、くるみこんじゃうの。」シャーロットは、ハエをつかみ、糸をシュッシュッと吐き出し、グルグルと、何重にもハエをくるみこみました。ハエは、もう動けません。ウィルバーは、その様子をぞっとしながら眺めていました。自分の目が信じられませんでした。ハエは、嫌いだが、なんだかかわいそうになりました。)

"There!" said Charlotte. "Now I knock him out, so he'll be more comfortable." She bit the fly. "He can't feel a thing now," she remarked. "He'll make a perfect breakfast for me."
(「ほらね、次は、気絶させるのよ。そうしたら、ハエは、苦しまないで済むでしょ。」そういってシャーロットは、ハエに噛み付きました。「さぁ、これでハエは、何も感じなくなったょ。朝ごはんの準備ができたって訳ね。」)

"You mean you eat flies?" gasped Wilbur.
(「きみ、ハエを食べるっていうの?」ウィルバーは、びっくりして訊きました。)

"Certainly. Filies, bugs, grasshoppers, gnats, midges, daddy longlegs, centipedes, mosquitoes, crickets--anything that is careless enough to get caught in my web. I have to live, don't I?"
(「もちろんよ。ハエ、小虫、バッタ、選りすぐりのコガネムシ、ガ、蝶、おいしいゴキブリ、ブヨ、ユスリカ、ガガンボ、ムカデ、カ、コオロギ、――巣に引っかかったうっかり者なら、何だって。私だって、生きていかなきゃならないんですもの。そうでしょ?」)

"Why, yes, of course," said Wilbur. "Do they taste good?"
(「そりゃ、そうだけど。でも、そんなの、おいしいの?」ウィルバーは、また訊きました。)

"Delisious. Of course, I don't really eat them. I drink them--drink their blood. I love blood," said Charlotte, and her pleasant, thin voice grew even thinner and more pleasant.
(「もちろんおいしいわよ。と言っても、本当に食べるわけじゃないの。飲むって言ったほうが正しいかな、私は、血を飲むのよ。血が大好きなの。」シャーロットは、ますますか細く、うっとりとした声でいいました。)

"Don't say that!" groaned Wilbur. "Please don't say things like that!"
(「やめてよ。お願いだから、そんなこといわないで!」ウィルバーはうめきました。)

"Why not? It's true, and I have to say what is true. I am not entirely happy about my diet of flies and bugs, but it's the way I'm made. A spider has to pick up a living somehow or other, and I happen to be a trapper. I just naturally build a web and trap flies and other insects. My mother was a trapper before me. Her mother was a trapper before her. All our family have been trappers. Way back for thousands and thousands of years we spiders have been laying for flies and bugs."
(「あらどうして?本当のことなのよ。本当のことを言わなくっちゃ。ハエや虫を食べるなんて、私だってどうかと思うけど、体が、そういう風にできているのよ。クモだって、どうにかして生きていかなきゃならないでしょ?で、私の場合は、たまたま生きていく手段が、網を張ることだったの。私は、網を張り、ハエだとか他の虫を捕まえるように生まれついているの。私のお母さんも網を張って生きてきたし、お母さんのお母さんも網を張って生きてきたの。私の家族は、みんなそうやって暮して来たの。何千年も前から、私たちクモは、ハエや、虫を待ち伏せして、捕まえてきたの。」)

"It's a miserable inheritance," said Wilbur, gloomily. He was sad because his new friend was so bloodthirsty.
(「ずいぶんとひどい性質が遺伝してるんだね。」ウィルバーは、暗い声で、言いました。せっかく友達ができたのに、どうもその友達は、むごたらしいことが好きなようです。)

"Yes, it is," agreed Charlotte. "But I can't help it. I don't know how the first spider in the early days of the world happened to think up this fancy idea of spinning a web, but she did, and it was clever of her, too. And since then, all of us spiders have had to work the same trick. It's not a bad pitch, on the whole."
(「そうね」とシャーロットも頷きました。「でも、私には、どうしょうもないのよ。世界で最初のクモが、どうして網を張るなんて思いついたのか知らないけど、とにかくそうやって生きようと考えたのね。とても賢かったと思う。それ以来私たちクモは、みな同じよう行きて行くことになってるの。よく考えればそういう生き方も、悪い生き方でもないのよ。」)

"It's cruel," replied Wilbur, who did not intend to be argued out of his position.
(「残酷だよ。」と、自分の考えを変えるつもりのないウィルバーは、言いました。)

"Well, you can't talk," said Charlotte. "You have your meals brought to you in a pail. Nobody feeds me. I have to get my own living. I live by my wits. I have to be sharp and clever, lest I go hungry. I have to think things out, catch what I can, take what comes is flies and insects and bugs. And furtbermore," said Charlotte, shaking one of her legs, "do you realize that if I didn't catch bugs and eat them, bugs would increase and multiply and get so numerous that they'd destroy the earth, wipe out everything?"
(「あなたは、そう言えるだろうね。なにしろ、バケツで食べ物を持ってきてもらえるんだから。私には、誰もそんなことしてくれないよ。自分で暮らしを立てていかないといけないの。自分で機転を利かせて、油断しないで、賢くやらなきゃいけないの。そうじゃないと、飢え死にしてしまうのよ。だから、ちゃんと考えて捕まえられるものを、捕まえて、引っかかったものを餌にしないとね。そして、たまたま私の網に引っかかるのは、ハエや虫や羽虫なのよ。それに――」と、シャーロットは、1本の足を震わせながら続けました。「――もしも私が、虫を捕まえて食べないと、虫がどんどん増えて、この地球を壊し、すべてを滅ぼしてしまうこと、あなた知ってるかしら?」)

"Really?" said Wilbur. "I wouldn't want that to happen. Perhaps your web is a good thing after all."
(「ほんとに?そんなことになったら、嫌だなあ。だったら、君の網は役に立ってるのかもしれないね。」と、ウィルバーは、言いました。)

The goose had been listening to this conversation and chucking to herself. "There are a lot of things Wilbur doesn't know about life," she thought. "He's really a very innocent little pig. He doesn't even know what's going to happen to him around Christmastime; he has no idea that Mr.Zuckerman and Lurvy are plotting to kill him." And the goose raised herself a bit and poked her eggs a little further under her so that they would receive the full heat from her warm body and soft feathers.
(この会話を聞いていたガチョウのおばさんは、くすくす笑いました。「ウィルバーは、生きるってことが、まだ何にもわかっちゃいないのね。全く、無邪気な子豚だよ。クリスマスのころには、自分がどうなるかも知らないんだから。ザッカーマンさんと、ラービィーが、あの子を殺そうとしているなんて、夢にも思っちゃいないんだね。」ガチョウのおばさんは、そう思いながら、すっと首を伸ばし、自分の体温と、やわらかい羽で、ちゃんと温まるように、たまごをつついて、真ん中に寄せました。)

Charlotte stood quietly over the fly, preparing to eat it. Wilbur lay down and closed his eyes. He was tired from his wakeful night and from the excitement of meeting someone for the first time. A breeze brought him the smell of clover--the sweet-smelling wourld beyound, all right. But what a gamble friendship is! Charlotte is fierce, brutal, scheming, bloodthirsty--everything I don't like. How can I learn to like her, even though she is pretty and, of course, clever?"
(シャーロットは、ハエの上に静かに立って、食べようとしていました。ウィルバーは、横になって静かに目を閉じました。眠りの浅い夜を過ごしたせいと、新しい友達に出会ったせいで、くたびれていました。そよ風が、クローバーの香りを運んできました。塀の向こうには、甘い香りのする世界が広がっているのです。「やれやれ、友達はできたけど、友情っていうのは、なかなか難しいものなんだな。シャーロットは、荒っぽいし、情け知らずだし、ずるいし、血に飢えているときている。そのどれもが、僕には、好きになれないよ。いくらかわいい、頭のいいクモだっていっても、好きになるのは、大変そうだな。」)

Wilbur was merely suffering the doubts and fears that often go with finding a new friend. In good time he was to discover that he was mistaken about Charlotte. Underneath her rather bold and cruel exterior, she had a kind heart, and she was to prove loyaal and true the very end.
(新しい友達ができたばかりのときは、誰でも不安になったり、疑ったりしがちですが、ウィルバーもそんな不安や疑いを感じていました。けれども、そのうちウィルバーは、シャーロットのことを誤解していたことに気づきます。一見したところ、図太くて、残酷なシャーロットですが、本当は、やさしい心を持っていたのです。そして、最後まで友達を思い、誠を尽くしたのです。)

英文のみです。
X. Charlotte

The night seemed long. Wilbur's stomach was empty and his mind was full. And when your stomach is empty and your mind is full, it's always hard to sleep.

A dozen times during the night Wilbur woke and stared into the blackness, listening to the sounds and trying to figure out what time it was. A barn is never perfectly quiet. Even at midnight there is usually something sirring.

The first time he woke, he heard Templeton gnawing a hole in the grain bin. Templeton's teeth scraped loudly against the wood and made quite a racket. "That crazy rat!" thought Wilbur. "Why dose he have to stay up all night, grinding his clashers and destroying people's property? Why can't he go to sleep, like any decent animal?"

The second time Wilbur woke, he heard the goose turning on her nest and chuckling to herself.

"What time is it? whispered Wilbur to the goose."

"Probably-obably-obably about half-past eleven," said the goose. "Why aren't you a sleep, Wilbur?"

"Too many things on my mind," said Wilbur.

"Well," said the goose, "that's not my trouble. I have nothing at all on my mind, but I've too many things under my behind. Have you ever tried t osleep while sitting on eight eggs?"

"No," replied Wilbur. "I suppose it is uncom for table. How long does it take a goose egg to hatch?"

"Approximately-oximately thirty days, all told," answered the goose. "But I cheat a little. On warm afternoons, I just pull a little atraw over the eggs and go out for a walk."

Wilbur yawned and went back to sleep. In his dreams he heard again the voice saying, "I'll be a fiend to you. Go to sleep--you'll see me in the morning."

About half an hour before dawn, Wilbur woke and listened. The barn was still dark. The sheep lay motionless. Even the goose was quiet. Overhead, on the main floor, nothing stirred: the cows were resting, the hourses dozed. Templeton had quit work and gone off somewhere on an errand. The only sound was a slight scraping noise from the rooftop, where the weather-vane swung back and forth. Wilbur loved the barn when it was like this--calm and quiet, waiting for light.

"Day is almost here," he thought.

Through a small window, a faint gleam appeared. One bu one the stars went out. Wilbur could see the goose a few feet away. She sat with head tucked under a wing. Then he could see the sheep and the lambs. The sky lightened.

"Oh, beautiful day, it is here at last! Today I shall find my friend."

Wilbur looked everywhere. He searched his pen thoroughly. He examined the window ledge, stared up at the ceiling. But he saw nothing new. Finally he decided he would have to spoke up. He hated to break the lovely stillness of dawn by using his voice, but he couldn't think of any other way to locate the mysterious new friend who was nowhere to be seen. So wilbur cleared his throat.

"Attention, please!" he said in a loud, firm voice. "Will the party who addressed me at bedtime last night kindly make himself or herself known by giving an appropriate sign or signal!"

Wilbur paused and listened. All the other animals lifted their heads and stared at him. Wilbur blushed. But he saw determined to get in touch with his unknown friend.

"Attention, please!" he said. "I will repeat the message. Will the party who addressed me at bedtime last night kindly speak up. please tell me where you are, if you are my friend!"

The sheep looked at each other in disgust.

"Stop your nonsense, Wilbur!" said the oldest sheep. "If you have a new friend here, you are probably disturbing his rest; and the quickest way to spoil a friendship it to wake somebody up in the morning before he is ready. How can you be sure your friend is an early riser?"

"I beg everyone's pardon," whispered Wilbur. "I didn't mean to be objectionable."

He lay down meekly in the manure, facing the door. He did not know it, but his friend was very near. And the old sheep was right--the friend was still asleep.

Soon Lurvy appeared with slops for breakfast. Wilbur rushed out, ate everything in a hurry, and licked the trough. The sheep moved offdown the lane, the gander waddled along behind them, pulling grass. And then, just as Wilbur was setting down for his morning nap, he heard again the thin voice that had addressed him the night before.

"Salutations!" said the voice.

Wilbur jumped to his feet. "Salu-what?" he cried.

"Salutations!" repeated the voice.

"What are they, and where are you?" screamed Wilbur. "Please, please, tell me where you are. And what say 'salutations,' it's just my fancy way of saying hello or good morning. Actually, it's silly expression, and I am surprised that I used it at all. As for my where-abouts, that's easy. Look up here in the corner of the doorway! Here I am. Look, I'm waving!"

At last Wilbur saw the creature that had spoken to him in such a kindly way. Stretched across the upper part of the doorway was a big spiderweb, and hanging from the top of the web, head down, was a large grey spoder. She was about the size of a gumdrop. She had eight legs, and she was waving one of them at Wilbur in friendly greeting. "See me now?" shw asked.

"Oh, yes indeed," said Wilbur. "Yes indeed! How are you? Good morning! Salutations! Very pleased to meet you. What is your name, please? May I have your name?"

"My name," said the spider, "is Charlotte."

"Charlotte what?" asked Wilbur, eagerly.

"Charlotte A.Cavatica. But just call me Charlotte."

"I think you're beautiful," said Wilbur.

"Well, i am pretty," replied Charlotte. "There's no denying that. Almost all spiders are rather nice-looking. I'm not as flashy as some, but I'll do. I wish I could see you, Wilbur, as clearly as you can see me."

"Why can't you? asked the pig. "I'm right here."

"Yes, but I'm near-sighted. It's good in some ways, not so good in others. Watch me wrap up this fly."

A fly that had been crawling along Wilbur's trough had flown up and blundered into the lower part of Charlotte's web and was tangled in the sticky threads. The fly was beautiful its wings furiously, trying to break loose and free itself.

"First," said Charlotte, "I dive at him." She plunged headfirst toward the fly. As she dropped, a tiny silken thread unwound fro, her rear end.

"Next, I wrap him up." She grabbed the fly, threw a few jets of silk around it, and rolled it over and over, wrapping it so that it couldn't move. Wilbur watched in horror. He could hardly believe what he was seeing, and although he deteddted flies, he was sorry for this one.

"There!" said Charlotte. "Now I knock him out, so he'll be more comfortable." She bit the fly. "He can't feel a thing now," she remarked. "He'll make a perfect breakfast for me."

"You mean you eat flies?" gasped Wilbur.

"Certainly. Filies, bugs, grasshoppers, gnats, midges, daddy longlegs, centipedes, mosquitoes, crickets--anything that is careless enough to get caught in my web. I have to live, don't I?"

"Why, yes, of course," said Wilbur. "Do they taste good?"

"Delisious. Of course, I don't really eat them. I drink them--drink their blood. I love blood," said Charlotte, and her pleasant, thin voice grew even thinner and more pleasant.

"Don't say that!" groaned Wilbur. "Please don't say things like that!"

"Why not? It's true, and I have to say what is true. I am not entirely happy about my diet of flies and bugs, but it's the way I'm made. A spider has to pick up a living somehow or other, and I happen to be a trapper. I just naturally build a web and trap flies and other insects. My mother was a trapper before me. Her mother was a trapper before her. All our family have been trappers. Way back for thousands and thousands of years we spiders have been laying for flies and bugs."

"It's a miserable inheritance," said Wilbur, gloomily. He was sad because his new friend was so bloodthirsty.

"Yes, it is," agreed Charlotte. "But I can't help it. I don't know how the first spider in the early days of the world happened to think up this fancy idea of spinning a web, but she did, and it was clever of her, too. And since then, all of us spiders have had to work the same trick. It's not a bad pitch, on the whole."

"It's cruel," replied Wilbur, who did not intend to be argued out of his position.

"Well, you can't talk," said Charlotte. "You have your meals brought to you in a pail. Nobody feeds me. I have to get my own living. I live by my wits. I have to be sharp and clever, lest I go hungry. I have to think things out, catch what I can, take what comes is flies and insects and bugs. And furtbermore," said Charlotte, shaking one of her legs, "do you realize that if I didn't catch bugs and eat them, bugs would increase and multiply and get so numerous that they'd destroy the earth, wipe out everything?"

"Really?" said Wilbur. "I wouldn't want that to happen. Perhaps your web is a good thing after all."

The goose had been listening to this conversation and chucking to herself. "There are a lot of things Wilbur doesn't know about life," she thought. "He's really a very innocent little pig. He doesn't even know what's going to happen to him around Christmastime; he has no idea that Mr.Zuckerman and Lurvy are plotting to kill him." And the goose raised herself a bit and poked her eggs a little further under her so that they would receive the full heat from her warm body and soft feathers.

Charlotte stood quietly over the fly, preparing to eat it. Wilbur lay down and closed his eyes. He was tired from his wakeful night and from the excitement of meeting someone for the first time. A breeze brought him the smell of clover--the sweet-smelling wourld beyound, all right. But what a gamble friendship is! Charlotte is fierce, brutal, scheming, bloodthirsty--everything I don't like. How can I learn to like her, even though she is pretty and, of course, clever?"

Wilbur was merely suffering the doubts and fears that often go with finding a new friend. In good time he was to discover that he was mistaken about Charlotte. Underneath her rather bold and cruel exterior, she had a kind heart, and she was to prove loyaal and true the very end.

日本語訳のみです。
5.シャーロット

夜がとても長く感じられました。ウィルバーのおなかの中は、からっぽでしたが、頭の中は思いでいっぱいでした。そして、おなかの中がからっぽで、頭の中がいっぱいというときは、なかなか眠れないものです。
ウィルバーは、夜中に何度も目を覚まし、闇を見つめながら、周りの音を聞いて、今は何時だろうか、と考えました。納屋は、しーんと静まりかえることはありません。真夜中でも、たいていは、何か動きがあるのです。
最初に目を覚ましたときは、テンプルトンが穀物の貯蔵箱に穴をあけているところでした。テンプルトンの歯が木をガリガリとかじる音が、大きく響いていました。
「しょうがないねずみだな。なんだって夜中に起きてて、牙をといだり、人間のものを壊したりするんだろう? どうして、他のちゃんとした動物みたいに、夜に眠ることができないんだろう?」とウィルバーは、思いました。
次にウィルバーが目を覚ましたときには、ガチョウのおばさんがグワッグワッといいながら、巣の上で向きを変えているところでした。
「今何時なの?」ウィルバーは、小さな声でガチョウに尋ねました。
「たぶん、多分、多分、11時半くらいじゃないかね。あんた、どうして起きているの、ウィルバー?」と、ガチョウのおばさんが言いました。
「頭の中がいっぱい過ぎるんだよ。」とウィルバー。
「あらまぁ、私は、そんなことないね。頭の中には、何もないからさ。でも、おしりの下には、いっぱいいっぱいあるんだけどね。あんた、たまご8個を温めながら眠ろうとしたことはあるかい?」
「ううん。きっと、モゾモゾするんだろうな。ガチョウのたまごってどのくらいしたら孵るの?」
「だいたい30日くらいかしら、かしら。」とガチョウは答えました。「でも、あたしは、ちょっとばかりズルをしているんだよ。お昼過ぎの暖かいときには、たまごの上にちょこっと藁をかけておいて、散歩に出かけるのさ。」
ウィルバーは、あくびをして、また眠りました。夢の中でまたさっきの声がしました。
「わたし、お友達になってあげるわ。おやすみなさい。朝になったら会いましょうね。」
夜が明ける30分ほど前に、ウィルバーは、目を覚まし、耳をそばだてました。
納屋の中は、まだ真っ暗でした。羊たちはおとなしく寝ていました。ガチョウのおばさんも静かです。
上の階もひっそりとしていました。雌牛は眠り、馬はまどろんでいるのでしょう。テンプルトンは、作業をやめて、どこかへ用足しにでかけていました。聞こえるのは、屋根の上で、かすかにきしる音ばかり。風見がくるくると回っている音です。ウィルバーは、こんなときの納屋が大好きでした。納屋も静かに夜明けを待っているのです。「もうすぐ朝がくるぞ。」とウィルバーは、思いました。
小さな窓が、ほんのりと白み始めました。星がひとつ、またひとつと消えていきました。すぐそこにガチョウのおばさんが見えてきました。頭を翼に突っ込んでいます。そのうちに、羊や子羊の姿も見えてきました。空が明るくなってきたのです。
「ああ、きれいな朝だ。ようやく夜が明けた!!今日は、友達に会えるぞ。」
ウィルバーは、あたりをきょろきょろ見回しました。部屋の中を隅々まで探してみました。窓敷居を調べ、天井を見上げました。でも、何も変わったのは、見つかりません。とうとうウィルバーは、声をかけてみることにしました。本当は、大声を出して、夜明けのすばらしい静けさをやぶりたくなかたのです。でも、どこを探しても不思議な友達は、見つからなかったので、呼んでみる以外に方法はないように思えました。そこで、ウィルバーは、咳払いをしてから、はっきりと大きな声で言いました。
「どうか聞いてください!夕べ、寝るときに僕に声をかけてくれた方、どうか合図をしてどこにいるか、教えてくれませんか?」
ウィルバーは、みみを澄ましました。他の動物たちが、頭を持ち上げて、じろじろ見ています。ウィルバーは、赤くなりました。でも、どうしても声をかけてくれた友達と連絡をとろうと、心に決めていました。
「聞いてください!僕、もう一度繰り返します。夕べ、寝るときに僕に声をかけてくれた方、どうか返事をしてください。友達ならどこにいるのか教えてください!!」
羊たちがウンザリしたように顔を見合わせました。
「うるさいわよウィルバー。」一番年上の羊が、言いました。「もし、その新しい友達とやらが、ここにいるとしても、あんたがその友達の眠りを邪魔しているじゃないの。友情を壊す早道は、まだ眠っている友達を、無理に起こすことだよ。その友達が、早起きかどうかあんだ、わかってんの??」
「ごめんなさい。いやな思いをさせるつもりはなかったんです。」とウィルバーは、小さな声で謝りました。
ウィルバーは、戸口のほうを向いて、堆肥の上におとなしく横になりました。まだ知らなかったのですが、友達は、すぐそばにいたのです。それに友達は、羊の言ったとおり まだ眠っていたのです。
まもなく、ラーヴィーが、残飯を持ってきました。朝ごはんの時間でした。ウィルバーは、飛び出して行って、がつがつと、残飯を食べ、餌箱まできれいになめました。羊たちは、小道を通って草地に出て行き、ガチョウのおじさんも、羊の後から草をつっつきながらヨチヨチと外に出て行きました。ウィルバーが、朝のうたた寝をしようとしていたときです。夕べ聞いたか細い声が、また聞こえてきました。
「ご機嫌うるわしくていらっしゃる?」とその声は、言いました。
ウィルバーは、はっとして起き上がりました。
「ごきげん、なんですって?」
「ごきげんうるわしくていらっしゃる?」とその声は、繰り返しました。
「それ、どういう意味なの?それに、きみは、どこにいるの?」とウィルバーは叫びました。「お願い、どこにいるのか教えて。それに、何を言っているのかも教えてよ。」
「私は、ただご挨拶しているだけだよ。」と言いました。「こんにちは、とか、おはようって言う代わりに、そう言ったの。でも変な言い方かも知れないね。どうして、こんな言い方したのか、自分でもわからないわ。私の居場所なら、簡単よ。戸口の上の隅っこを見て!!ほらねここよ。合図してるでしょ。」
ようやくウィルバーは、親切に声をかけてくれた友達を見つけました。戸口の方に、大きなくもの巣がかかっていて、そのくもの巣のてっぺんから、大きな灰色のクモが、頭をさかさまにしてぶら下がっていました。ゼリーキャンディーくらいの大きさのクモです。8本ある足の1本を、ウィルバーに向かって振っていました。
「見えたでしょ?」クモは言いました。
「うん、見えたよ。」とウィルバーはこたえました。「ちゃんと見えた!はじめまして。おはよう!ごきげんうるわしくて? 会えて嬉しいな。名前はなんて言うの?名前教えてくれないかな?」
「私の名前は、シャーロット。」とクモは言いました。
「名字は?」ウィルバーは、勢い込んで尋ねました。
「シャーロット・A・キャバティカって言うの。でも、シャーロットって呼んでね。」
「きみは、きれいだね。」ウィルバーは、言った。
「ええ、私は、きれいなの。それは、間違いないわね。クモは、たいていみんな美しい姿をしているのよ。雲の中には、もっと派手なものもいるけど、私は、これでいいのウィルバー、わたしにも、あなたがはっきり見えるといいんだけど…。」
「どうして見えないの?僕ここにいるでしょ。」
「ええ、でも私は、近眼なの。そのほうが便利な時もあるけど、そうでないときもある。このハエ、くるんじゃうから見ててね。」
ウィルバーの餌箱のうえの這っていた1匹のハエが、飛び上がったようにシャーロットの網の下のほうに引っかかり、ネバネバした糸に絡まってしまった。ハエは、バタバタと羽を動かして、網から抜け出そうと、もがいていました。
「まず最初に、私は、飛び掛るのよ。」
そう言うと、シャーロットは、ハエに向かって突進しました。細い絹のような糸を後ろから紡ぎだしながら、スーッと下がってきます。
「そして、くるみこんじゃうの。」
シャーロットは、ハエをつかみ、糸をシュッシュッと吐き出し、グルグルと、何重にもハエをくるみこみました。ハエは、もう動けません。ウィルバーは、その様子をぞっとしながら眺めていました。自分の目が信じられませんでした。ハエは、嫌いだが、なんだかかわいそうになりました。
「ほらね、次は、気絶させるのよ。そうしたら、ハエは、苦しまないで済むでしょ。」そういってシャーロットは、ハエに噛み付きました。
「さぁ、これでハエは、何も感じなくなったょ。朝ごはんの準備ができたって訳ね。」
「きみ、ハエを食べるっていうの?」ウィルバーは、びっくりして訊きました。
「もちろんよ。ハエ、小虫、バッタ、選りすぐりのコガネムシ、ガ、蝶、おいしいゴキブリ、ブヨ、ユスリカ、ガガンボ、ムカデ、カ、コオロギ、――巣に引っかかったうっかり者なら、何だって。私だって、生きていかなきゃならないんですもの。そうでしょ?」
「そりゃ、そうだけど。でも、そんなの、おいしいの?」ウィルバーは、また訊きました。
「もちろんおいしいわよ。と言っても、本当に食べるわけじゃないの。飲むって言ったほうが正しいかな、私は、血を飲むのよ。血が大好きなの。」シャーロットは、ますますか細く、うっとりとした声でいいました。
「やめてよ。お願いだから、そんなこといわないで!」ウィルバーはうめきました。
「あらどうして?本当のことなのよ。本当のことを言わなくっちゃ。ハエや虫を食べるなんて、私だってどうかと思うけど、体が、そういう風にできているのよ。クモだって、どうにかして生きていかなきゃならないでしょ?で、私の場合は、たまたま生きていく手段が、網を張ることだったの。私は、網を張り、ハエだとか他の虫を捕まえるように生まれついているの。私のお母さんも網を張って生きてきたし、お母さんのお母さんも網を張って生きてきたの。私の家族は、みんなそうやって暮して来たの。何千年も前から、私たちクモは、ハエや、虫を待ち伏せして、捕まえてきたの。」
「ずいぶんとひどい性質が遺伝してるんだね。」
ウィルバーは、暗い声で、言いました。せっかく友達ができたのに、どうもその友達は、むごたらしいことが好きなようです。「そうね」とシャーロットも頷きました。「でも、私には、どうしょうもないのよ。世界で最初のクモが、どうして網を張るなんて思いついたのか知らないけど、とにかくそうやって生きようと考えたのね。とても賢かったと思う。それ以来私たちクモは、みな同じよう行きて行くことになってるの。よく考えればそういう生き方も、悪い生き方でもないのよ。」
「残酷だよ。」と、自分の考えを変えるつもりのないウィルバーは、言いました。
「あなたは、そう言えるだろうね。なにしろ、バケツで食べ物を持ってきてもらえるんだから。私には、誰もそんなことしてくれないよ。自分で暮らしを立てていかないといけないの。自分で機転を利かせて、油断しないで、賢くやらなきゃいけないの。そうじゃないと、飢え死にしてしまうのよ。だから、ちゃんと考えて捕まえられるものを、捕まえて、引っかかったものを餌にしないとね。そして、たまたま私の網に引っかかるのは、ハエや虫や羽虫なのよ。それに――」と、シャーロットは、1本の足を震わせながら続けました。「――もしも私が、虫を捕まえて食べないと、虫がどんどん増えて、この地球を壊し、すべてを滅ぼしてしまうこと、あなた知ってるかしら?」
「ほんとに?そんなことになったら、嫌だなあ。だったら、君の網は役に立ってるのかもしれないね。」と、ウィルバーは、言いました。
この会話を聞いていたガチョウのおばさんは、くすくす笑いました。
「ウィルバーは、生きるってことが、まだ何にもわかっちゃいないのね。全く、無邪気な子豚だよ。クリスマスのころには、自分がどうなるかも知らないんだから。ザッカーマンさんと、ラービィーが、あの子を殺そうとしているなんて、夢にも思っちゃいないんだね。」
ガチョウのおばさんは、そう思いながら、すっと首を伸ばし、自分の体温と、やわらかい羽で、ちゃんと温まるように、たまごをつついて、真ん中に寄せました。
シャーロットは、ハエの上に静かに立って、食べようとしていました。ウィルバーは、横になって静かに目を閉じました。眠りの浅い夜を過ごしたせいと、新しい友達に出会ったせいで、くたびれていました。そよ風が、クローバーの香りを運んできました。
塀の向こうには、甘い香りのする世界が広がっているのです。
「やれやれ、友達はできたけど、友情っていうのは、なかなか難しいものなんだな。シャーロットは、荒っぽいし、情け知らずだし、ずるいし、血に飢えているときている。そのどれもが、僕には、好きになれないよ。いくらかわいい、頭のいいクモだっていっても、好きになるのは、大変そうだな。」
新しい友達ができたばかりのときは、誰でも不安になったり、疑ったりしがちですが、ウィルバーもそんな不安や疑いを感じていました。けれども、そのうちウィルバーは、シャーロットのことを誤解していたことに気づきます。一見したところ、図太くて、残酷なシャーロットですが、本当は、やさしい心を持っていたのです。そして、最後まで友達を思い、誠を尽くしたのです。


Charlotte's Web 6



Page Top